H2H: The Study – Who welcome the broken and breathe comfort into tender places


By: Natasha Longmire

We don’t have to look too far to find brokenness in this world. Jesus is coming, and the weary world will indeed rejoice. But for now, we see brokenness. We see broken hearts, fractured in two with the loss of love. We see broken spirits, crushed by the weight of expectations. We see broken families, split at the seams. We see broken governments, exploiting the vulnerable. We see broken people the hurting, the lonely, the sick, and the weary.

So we wait. We wait with expectation and courage for the Light of the World. He is coming for you, and for me. For each one of us who knows what it means to feel broken. For each one of us waiting for this season to finally end. For each one of us longing for a small bit of relief from the agony, for this wilderness to cease. We are waiting for all things to be made right, for Him to make all things new (Revelation 21:5).

Let us not be afraid of the brokenness in us. Let us not be afraid of the brokenness in others. In 2 Corinthians 12, the Apostle Paul pleaded with the Lord to remove his thorn in the flesh, but the Lord said, “My grace is all you need. My power works best in weakness.” (2 Corinthians 12:9, NLT) Paul in response boasted all the more gladly in his weakness, so that the power of Christ rested upon him. Let us be like Paul who was content with weakness, insult, hardship, and persecution. For he said, “For when I am weak, then I am strong.” (2 Corinthians 12:10, NLT)

I pray that we will know the God of comfort, the Prince of Peace, Jesus himself. That we would know him deeply, and we would walk in His ways. That we would glimpse God’s heart for the broken. I pray that we would do as He did. I pray that we would be like Jesus, who sought out the wayward people, the tax collectors, the sinners, and the lepers. I pray that we would lead by His example, being quick to lavish love and grace on others. I pray that we would recognize both outward and inward brokenness. Let us remember the poor, the homeless, the sick, and the addicts; but also, the broken-hearted divorcees, the lonely widows, the mentally ill, the conflicted adolescents, and the struggling students. I pray that we would welcome the broken, even when it is inconvenient for our schedules or our bank accounts. I pray that our tables would be long, and that our arms would be wide open. And I pray that we would comfort those in any affliction, with the comfort we ourselves have received through Christ. To God be the glory.

“All praise to God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. God is our merciful Father and the source of all comfort. He comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort others. When they are troubled, we will be able to give them the same comfort God has given us. For the more we suffer for Christ, the more God will shower us with his comfort through Christ (2 Corinthians 1:3-5, NLT).”